Engagement Examples

Engagement Examples

Ways Ambassadors Are Engaging

Here are some specific examples of the ways that ambassadors engage.

  • Social Media Support: One of the easiest and most beneficial ways ambassadors can advance the work of the community is to help spread the word on announcements, new offerings, and more, via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube.
    • Beth Kanter (@Kanter) regularly tweets or RTs news from the community to her 400,000 followers. Jacob Harold (@JacobHarold) uses his personal Twitter account as well as the @GuideStarUSA account to share high-performance articles and links.
    • Denise Zeman also shares community news on her Facebook page.
  • Community Promotion: Ambassadors bring the community and its works, e.g., PI, into their organization, communities, and networks through conversations, presentations, and adoptions.
    • Julie Russell, like many other ambassadors, is involved with a number of organizations and groups. She weaves the community purpose, the messages of high performance, and its works into college classes, workshops, board meetings, and grantee convenings.
  • Community as Learning Resource: It takes time to trust the asynchronous nature of online discussions, but ambassadors come to see the community as a valuable resource for learning, getting help, and gaining different insights via posing questions and requests.
    • Triggered by a New York Times investigative report questioning the validity of social impact bond results, the community weighed in on factors that might not be getting enough attention in the public debate. The discussion resulted in a curated piece, “SIBs: What’s Missing?” that the community shared through social media and other channels. In parallel, we learned that Ambassador Gordon Berlin was releasing Learning from Experience: A Guide to Social Impact Bond Investing  which provided insights from implementing the nation’s first social impact bond at Rikers Island. Because of the learning that occurred during the community discussion, ambassadors were eager to share that resource as well.
    • Ambassador Anne Goodman asked fellow ambassadors for advice on how to structure a new Director of Outcomes and Evaluation position for the foundation she leads. Five ambassadors shared insights, and their inputs were curated to produce “Structuring a Director of Outcomes and Evaluation Position.”
  • Intellectual Contribution and Peer Review: Intellectual contribution is vital to how the community works collaboratively to develop its works, e.g., the PI. And, all works published by the community require explicit peer-review by ambassadors prior to any public availability. Depending on the subject matter, ambassadors may author parts of a work, provide specific feedback, and contribute editorial assistance.
    • During the development of Pillar 7 of the PI (External Evaluation for Mission Effectiveness), Mike Bailin convened a kitchen cabinet of ambassadors who are experts and leader practitioners in external evaluation, including Gordon BerlinDan Cardinali, David Hunter, Patti Patrizi, Fay Twersky, and others, resulting in a pillar that is greater than the sum of its parts. 
  • Micro-Communities Participation:Micro-communities advance specific issues, interests, or actions.
    • PI Editorial: The PI was developed, thanks to the collective contributions of more than 40 ambassadors, with oversight from a micro-community, led by Mike Bailin and Cynthia Figueroa and facilitated by Lowell Weiss and Mario Morino. Rick Wartzman and Lowell are current co-leads of a micro-community responsible for iteratively sharing versions and getting feedback related to the PI, developing updates, and vetting drafts with the community to produce the next release of the PI.
    • Performance Imperative Organizational Self-Assessment (PIOSA) Micro-Community: Since the launch of the PI in February 2015, ambassadors and other external parties expressed interest in having an assessment tool that could be used as a complement to the PI. “Content-area experts” for each of the pillars develop a draft set of “proof points” that an organization can use to identify strengths, weaknesses, and progress made on the journey toward high performance. The micro-community provides feedback and subsequent drafts are presented and will help in the final design, packaging and dissemination. Eventually, the full community will have the opportunity to provide input. Ambassadors Brad Dudding, Tracy Gray, Bob Rath, Lou Salza, and others have participated as content-area experts and members of the micro-community.
  • Growing the Community: Maintaining affinity and integrity are critical as we sustain and grow the community. Current ambassadors are vital to the identification/selection, invitation/onboarding, and engagement processes. Although the entire community is encouraged to nominate great candidates and vet candidate slates, there are ways that you can get more deeply involved in this important work.
    • Ambassadors like Ingvild BjornvoldDavid HunterAlice Shobe, and others have nominated individuals for consideration. Sam Cobbs is a lead advisor and Dominique Bernardo and Denise Zeman serve as members of the micro-community charged with finding, onboarding, and engaging new ambassadors. They work to present slates of candidates to the community for vetting and follow a rigorous process to ensure that potential candidates move through each step of the decision process. Numerous ambassadors have stepped up to issue invitations, providing an established and trusted connection to candidates.
  • Public Speaking Engagements: The Leap Ambassadors support team receives requests from conference/event organizers to find speakers, presenters, or panelists who can help spread the messages of high performance and talk about the community and/or PI specifically. Lowell Weiss heads up the community’s version of Match.com, and we’ve streamlined the process with a Speakers Request form.
    • Ambassadors Adrian Bordone, Isaac Castillo, Brad Dudding, Alnoor Ebrahim, Cynthia Figueroa, Debra Natenshon, Julie Russell, Nan Stone, Lowell Weiss, Mary Winkler, and others have provided keynotes, workshops, and panel discussions.
    • Standard presentation materials, PowerPoint slides, and videos are available for ambassadors to use to develop and support their talks.  Ambassadors also share materials they have used for presentations about the community and the PI, blog posts, and other applicable links.  Mari Kuraishi is just one of several ambassadors who have shared presentation slides.
  • Identification with the Community: Ambassadors have included their participation in the community in various ways, while maintaining the low-profile nature of how the community functions.
    • Beth Kanter, Brian Donley, and Darin McKeever tweeted they were honored to join the community
    • Debra Natenshon lists the Leap Ambassadors Community in her LinkedIn profile
    • Mario Morino mentions his participation in the Leap Ambassadors Community in his bio.